Egg Production / Coop Capacities – Round-Top Chicken Coops™

Advanced Detailed Information…
Numbers are guidance and are “not to exceed” figures based on various sizes / breeds of chickens. Read carefully for a better understanding of choosing a coop for your needs.

 Hen Capacity Color Key: Bantam Sizes  / Average Sizes / Large Breeds

Data Given In Format 

COOP | WITH EXTENSION


Egg Production

(per week)

Run Width x Length

(In feet rounded)

Run Space
(Feet squared)

Hen Capacity
(No Free Range Time)

Hen Capacity
(With Free Range Time)

Mobile


16-24 | Same


4'x5' | 4'x10'


20ft² | 40ft²

6/4/2 6/4/2

6/4/6/4/2

Backyard


24-36 | 36-48


5'x5' | 5'x10'


25ft² | 50ft²

10/6/14/10/6

14/10/14/10/6

Stand-Up


24-36 | Same


5'x6' | 5'x8'


30ft² | 40ft²

10/6/10/6/4

10/6/10/6/4

Chicken Loft


48-60 | n/a


9'x6' | n/a


54ft² | n/a

14/10/8 n/a

14/10/8 n/a

Walk-In


60-72 | Up to 100



10'x8' | 15'x8'


80ft² | 120ft²

30/20/12 35/25/15

30/20/12 35/25/15

Sustain


80-100 | n/a


10.5'x6.5' | n/a


68.25ft² | n/a

30/20/12 | n/a

30/20/12 | n/a

Note On Counts: Bantams and Silkies are considerably smaller than average sized chickens. Average sized hens are common bred Rhode Island Reds, Barred Rocks, Sex Links, Ameraucanas, Leg Horns, Wyndotts, Asutralorps, most Orpingtons and similar. We consider some of the larger breeds to be Brahmas, Jersey Giants and the like. Many show bred chickens are genetically larger than their common bred relatives. Overcrowding any coop can cause health risks to the birds because of (among other things) ventilation concerns and will make it to where you have to clean more frequently. Free range time is during the day-time hours and assumes 2-3 hours per day 50% of the week or more. Space for chickens is a very, very personal decision that takes in factors of perceived humaneness which we of course cannot measure. We offer these numbers as a guide based on our considerable experience, industry standards on ft2/bird and guidance from poultry academia. Rounding down can never hurt (we do not advocate keeping only one bird alone unless for quarantine purposes) and we do not recommend going any higher than stated counts.

A little more about how we count…

Combinations are based on (1) reasonable available roost space (2) egg box space and (3) ground impact. When we design a coop we target a minimum of 4 ft2 per averaged sized bird assuming them getting no free range time. This number is for ground impact reasons and assumes you have good drainage and the ground drys up between occasional rains.

The above numbers favor run space regardless of roost or egg box space. Run space is a very, very personal decision. Many coop makers certainly provide less than our 4 ft2 per bird (averaged sized) target for run space.  Our chicken keeping experience says 4 ft2 per hen is an acceptable number for healthy averaged sized hens that are caged 100% of the time and for things not to get too smelly.  If you have the space and the budget, adding run extensions is always a great thing. It can never hurt assuming the additional space is equally predator proof to your main coop.

Our numbers are next controlled by roost space.  In hot weather hens spread out a little, and conversely, in cold weather they will cuddle up more.  The numbers we use are for average sized hens in a broad range of temperatures. Hens are very communal and will often all gang up on one roost bar even if there are two.  Some coops don’t even provided roost bars.  Ours do because it is the natural best way for your hens to sleep at night.

Egg box space is not a limiting factor in any of the above stated scenarios.  Certainly chickens have personalities like people, and some hens are more picky and dominant about egg laying privacy, but in general chickens share a space together or just wait their turn for egg laying. Again, hens are very communal creatures.

Egg production ranges assume 5 eggs per week as a low and 6-7 as a high. Some areas of the country have longer off seasons for molting birds. Daylight hours, feed quality and age of hens also effect lay rates. And of course breeds. For example, Leghorns are laying machines compared to most other breeds and will regularly lay an egg every day. Some breeds may only lay 2-3 eggs per week and that is normal for that breed.

 


gotquestions

We just wanted you to know...
March 16, 2020
First off, we want to thank you for shopping at Roost & Root.  We are passionate about what we do and feel a great sense of purpose and pride in serving our customers over the past 7 years. Springtime is our normal peak season. With the CV-19 pandemic, we're busier than ever before with people seeking food security that comes from backyard farming. Dyan and I wanted to share a couple of things about how we are planning to behave while this spring season plays out.  
  1. Roost & Root is considered an essential livestock housing manufacturer and is not being asked to close. We work in an open air shop that allows for plenty of social distancing. We have put in place common sense protections. We expect little to no staffing issues.
  2. We don't want to raise our prices to make more money or slow down demand during this difficult season. Why punish our friends? We MAY have to raise prices if we are forced to purchase materials at higher costs as our profit margins are not enough to absorb significant materials increases.  We do not presently know of any such supply issue, but can imagine it's possible. 
  3. We have historically been able to keep our back-order to 3 weeks or so... we see this going out further due to several reasons...
    1. Our shop has a peak capacity due to size and can only responsibly  expand it so fast. We are expanding capacity though as we speak. See item 2 :-)
    2. We want our quality to stay high, so we will only add staff as fast as we can properly train them... and provide for their safety.
    3. We are located in an area where we cannot operate beyond M-F 7am to 7pm.
  4. We have indications from shippers that they have no plans to slow down.  So we do not believe shipping will present an issue.
  5. We plan to continue our policy of fulfilling orders in the order they are received and will not allow for "premium" pricing on orders to obtain a jump in the order queue.  
We have close to a 100% on time delivery and scheduling track record on over 10,000 orders over the past 7 years.  We're smart about what we do.  After you place your order, our system will clearly commit your order to a weekly production batch.  We, in good faith manage this promise given the above information and will promise to stay in touch if for any reason we learn that circumstances beyond our control cause us to think we'll miss our promised delivery.

Thank you very much!

Dyan & Montie Twining

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